Hired from the Hilltop

A Blog by Career and Professional Development at St. Edward's University

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#HiredFromtheHilltop Wednesdays

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#HiredfromtheHilltop Wednesdays

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My “Itchy Feet” and Me

veronica

Veronica Puente ’16 English Writing & Rhetoric

I’m about to graduate this December…Do I feel prepared for life after graduation? I do feel prepared for life after graduation. I feel ready for the real world. I know this isn’t a popular or widely held view. But that’s how I feel and I’m proud of that.I owe it all to the career center and my “itchy feet.

I’ve worked at Career and Professional Development for 3 years now, including this semester. Working there has exposed me to a variety of internship and program opportunities. Working there has also allowed me to develop a close relationship with the staff here. They, the staff, have been there to push me to apply to every internship and program imaginable. They pushed me and I applied. The perks of being a Student Career Educator. 
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#HiredfromtheHilltop Wednesdays

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Hindsight Is a Wonderful Thing but Foresight Is Better

Jessica Coronado

Jessica Coronado ’15

I graduated as a New College student from St. Edward’s University in December 2015 with a BA in Public Administration. My commencement ceremony was set for May 7 and by May 9 I learned of my acceptance into Northwestern University’s Masters of Public Policy & Administration online program. Now that I am a fully immersed graduate student I felt it appropriate to reflect upon the valuable lessons obtained at SEU, which now undoubtedly guide me through my graduate studies.

You see, three and a half years ago I became a non-traditional student, which in my case meant I was a working parent attending college. I was both excited and terrified to tackle my two remaining years as an undergrad with a new baby in tow, but I did it. While it may sound cliché, the secret was determination and time management. My advisor initially predicted that I would complete my remaining 60 credit hours in three years but I was determined to finish them in just two, which I eventually did. There was never any time to procrastinate nor was there an option to cut corners on assignments. I took advantage of very early mornings, mid-afternoon lunch breaks, and late evenings to study and stay on top of my schoolwork whilst doing my best to dedicate enough mommy time to my new family. It wasn’t easy but I wouldn’t have changed the experience for any other. Read More

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#HiredfromtheHilltop Wednesdays

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Becoming a Licensed Counselor; an inspiring and rewarding career path

Laurie Doran, LPC Career Counselor

Laurie Doran, LPC
Career Counselor

Professional Counselors work in private practice; at elementary and secondary schools; on college campuses, in criminal justice facilities, at community mental health centers, hospitals, nursing homes, managed care and non-profit agencies; and other settings across Texas. People come into the field of counseling through various sources; some having experienced successful careers in other (possibly related) fields while others may be already working in the field but desire to obtain the advanced degree and licensure. Some enter graduate school directly from undergraduate studies, gaining relevant experience along the way. These future counselors choose to enter a master’s program like the St. Edward’s University Master of Arts in Counseling, to study counseling and therapeutic techniques and approaches for a wide variety of populations. This program prepares them to work in a variety of settings to empower individuals, families, students and groups to accomplish their mental health, education and career goals. Professional Counselors are required by Texas statutes to hold a master’s or doctoral degree, complete extensive hours of post-graduate supervision, pass rigorous licensing exams and pursue continuing education. In addition to completing challenging coursework, these graduate students are also required to locate and apply to, secure and complete required practicum and internship experiences while in school; often while taking classes and working. These individuals must calculate, manage, and document their site hours according to population, individuals, groups, and administrative hours in and submit them to eligible to graduate. In addition, they must prepare for and pass the counseling licensure exam upon graduation. After successfully passing the state licensure exam, they must then work as a professional counseling intern post-graduation (under paid supervision of a counseling supervisor) until the appropriate number of hours are accumulated and submitted to the licensing board to receive full licensure.  This process can take up to 2 years’ post-graduation to finally become a fully licensed counselor. Read More

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#HiredfromtheHilltop Jobs & Internships This Week!

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Questions to Consider Before Deciding to Pursue a Graduate Degree

Raymond Rogers, Director of Career and Professional Development

Raymond Rogers, Director of Career and Professional Development

For several years I’ve met with students and alumni as they consider whether or not to pursue an advanced degree.  The decision is more complicated than many may think as one really needs to consider their reasons, and test those assumptions, before committing to a graduate program.  I usually start such conversations simply asking, “why.”  While some are easily able to provide a clear and well thought out rationale, I find that many seem to struggle when trying to describe their reasons.  I’ve heard many say something like, “A bachelor’s degree is so common now” or “A master’s degree is what it takes in today’s world to stand out from the crowd.”  While it is true that a larger and larger percentage of the US population can now claim completion of a bachelor’s degree (23% in 1995 compared to 33% in 2015), a master’s degree isn’t always the best way to become more marketable or competitive in the job market.  I wrote a blog entry for the Huffington Post last year that summarizes some of my advice for students and alumni who are in the exploration phase of considering graduate school.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ray-rogers/making-the-most-of-a-masters-degree_b_7036446.html Read More

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#HiredFromtheHilltop Returns!

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