Opportunities at Capital Factory for NSCI Students in 2018

Thanks to the generous support of a donor, the School of Natural Sciences is happy to announce the availability of three student co-working seats at the Capital Factory in downtown Austin.  The tech hub and start-up incubator has been an Austin landmark for years, and offers wireless internet, access to entrepreneurs and business mentors, and numerous seminars and presentations.  We are delighted to offer three students the chance to spend time at Capital Factory to pursue a project of their own design.

Eligible students will be majoring in the sciences, mathematics, computer science, or environmental science.  It is expected that students regularly spend time at the Capital Factory as part of their project, with more significant effort in the summer when classes on the main campus are not in session.  Project proposals may be for just the summer or may extend through the Fall semester as well.

A faculty member from NSCI will be present regularly to provide mentorship and guidance to students working on projects there.  Checking in with that faculty member is required for students working at Capital Factory as well.

For more information, please contact nscidean@stedwards.edu.

To apply, please fill out this survey.

Applications will be accepted through Friday, 11 May at 5 pm.

It is anticipated that projects at Capital Factory may begin as early as 15 May.

Department of Chemistry: Guest Speaker Series

2D or not 2D? Tribology, energy, and 2D nanomaterials

NSCI Chemistry Department hosts Dr. James D. Batteas, professor of chemistry at Texas A&M University, on Friday, 16 February at 3:00 p.m. in JBWN 206. An expert in surface chemistry and nanoscience, Dr. Batteas’ research focuses on the exploration and control of the surfaces and interfaces of materials, including the use of scanning probe microscopies to examine material properties on the atomic scale. His research group specializes in using nanomaterials and devices to develop custom-engineered surfaces and interfaces. They have developed a model platform to investigate the adhesive and fricational interactions at nanoscaled asperity-asperity contacts by using silica nanoparticles to for substrates with asperities of controlled radius of curvature (ca. 5-20nm), matching those found in many machined interfaces. In addition to the science of tribology, research activities and opportunities for REU experiences at TAMU will also be described.

St. Edward’s students find more information online. 

Student Open Office Hours

Join Dean Morris today at Jo’s in Meadows Cafe in Ragsdale Center from 1:30-3:30 PM for student open office hour!

Mass for the Feast of Albertus Magnus

Please remember to join the School of Natural Sciences tomorrow for the Mass for the Feast of Albertus Magnus. See you at Our Lady Queen of Peace Chapel at 5:15 PM! Students, alumni, staff, faculty, and friends of the School of Natural Sciences are welcome!

Student Open Office Hours

Join Dean Morris on Tuesday, October 31st at Jo’s Meadows Cafe in Ragsdale from 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM for student open office hours.

NSCI All-School Mass – Wed., 15 Nov. @ 5:15 pm in the Chapel

Dear faculty, staff, students, and alumni,

We’ll hold our first annual All-School Mass in the Chapel at St. Edward’s on Wed., 15 November at 5:15 pm in celebration of the Feast of Albertus Magnus, patron saint of Natural Sciences.

Please spread the word and join us as a community of faith to celebrate the Eucharist with Fr. Peter.
GM

SEU at STIx

In August 2017, the Department of Defense Basic Research Office hosted their first-ever Science, Technology & Innovation Exchange (STIx). This event which brought together speakers to address three major topics:

  1. The big question that my research seeks to answer
  2. The big question that my technology addresses
  3. The big question of identifying, nurturing, recruiting, and/or retaining top STEM talent

Assistant Professor of Chemistry Dr. Raychelle Burks was invited to speak on topic #3. She spoke about how she integrated to federally funding programs – one by the National Science Foundation and another by the U.S. Army – to recruit, train, and retain students to her research group. Her talk can be viewed in its entirety below and other STIx talks can be found here.

SEU Alumnus Celebrates 50 Years as Elsevier Author

http://scitechconnect.elsevier.com/interview-author-michael-lannunziata-part1/

Dr. Michael F. L’Annunziata (’65, Chemistry) has published several books with Elsevier over the years, including the Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis and Radioactivity:  Introduction and History.  In recognition of 50 years of working with Elsevier, the publisher posted a two-part interview with Dr. L’Annunziata.  In it, he recalls the important role St. Edward’s played in laying the foundation for a successful career.  Congratulations, Dr. L’Annunziata!

2017 Lucian Symposium Schedule – Friday, 29 September

From the 2017 Lucian Professor and Chair of Chemistry, Dr. Tricia Shepherd:

This week Friday, the Lucian Symposium will be held in Carter Auditorium beginning at 8:50 am.  You can find details on the Lucian Symposium website:  https://sites.stedwards.edu/lucian/.  The Lucian Symposium is an annual event, open to the public.

Lunch follows the keynote speakers.  After lunch, student research posters will be available for viewing in the halls of the John Brooks Williams North Building from 1:30 – 3:30 pm.

There will be four keynote speakers:

  • Thomas E. Cheatham, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry & Director of the Center for High Performance Computing at the University of Utah
  • Michelle M. Francl, Professor and Chair of Chemistry at Bryn Mawr College
  • Ward Thompson, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Kansas
  • Garritt Tucker, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Colorado School of Mines (http://inside.mines.edu/Garritt-Tucker)

While there will be a common thread among speakers in terms of the using various computational methods in their research, the application/connections with undergraduates in each Natural Science discipline was my goal for the symposium. In particular, the presentations will be broadly applicable as follows: Cheatham: Biology/Computer Science, Francl: Mathematics, Thompson:Chemistry, Tucker:Physics/Engineering. I have advised all the speakers to include background/context appropriate for a broad audience of majors that span the Natural Sciences. Below is the schedule with tentative titles:

Friday, Sept 29th
8:50 am welcome
9:00-9:45   Garritt Tucker: Exploring the Nanoscale Mechanisms of Functional Materials with Computational Materials Science
9:45-10:30   Ward Thompson: The Big Deal about Being Small: Dynamics and Spectroscopy in Nanopores
10:30-10:45   break
10:45-11:30   Michelle Francl: Tools for predicting and understanding molecular structure from paper and pencil to Beowulf clusters
11:30-12:15   Tom Cheatham: Optimizing the use of computers to understand the complexity of biomolecular systems
12:15-1:30   lunch
1:30-3:30   poster session

I appreciate your support of this annual event for our school!
Thanks,
Tricia

Tricia Shepherd, PhD
Chemistry Professor & Dept. Chair
St. Edward’s University

2017 Lucian Symposium and Poster Session

Dear colleagues and students,

A reminder to students that if you did research ANYWHERE this past summer and would like to present a poster on that work as part of the student poster session following this year’s Lucian Symposium (Friday, 29 September), here are the deadlines:

Students who would like to present a poster will need to submit their abstract and title by Noon, Friday, 15 September. To submit your abstract, visit https://cmt3.research.microsoft.com/LS2017 and click the “Registration” tab or “Create Account” link.  Once registered, you will receive an activation link and can then access the “2017 Lucian Symposium” conference.  To enter your research information, from the home page click the “Create new submission” link.  Note: if the conference is not visible from your home page when you log in, click the “All Conferences” tab then enter “2017 Lucian Symposium” in the filter search field and click the title once it is visible.

This year, we are again using Spoonflower to print fabric posters for each student so we will need extra time to allow for the print process. Submit your poster print request in PPT or PDF format as soon as you are able but absolutely no later than 10 am on Thursday, 14 September. Submit your requests to NSCI Poster Print Request.

Each student may have one poster printed by the School of Natural Sciences each academic year.  Additional poster printing should be paid for by research grant accounts as appropriate.  Students should use the poster they print for all appropriate conference presentations during the 2017 – 2018 academic year.  The poster template can be accessed through Box:  NSCI Poster Template.

NOTE:  posters submitted after 10 am on Thursday, 14 September will not be printed by the School of Natural Sciences.  I recommend that if you need to print your poster after that date, please look for poster printing services at local area businesses (e.g., FedEx print).

We are asking students to hang their posters by 3:00 pm on Thursday, 28 September.  That afternoon, the School of Natural Sciences Advisory Board will meet.  Members of the board often enjoy reading through student posters.  They will have time to do so after their meeting concludes around 4:30 pm that afternoon.

We ask students to take their posters down by 5 pm on Friday, 29 September.

We ask students to plan to be at their posters for some portion of the time period 1.30-3.30pm on Friday, 29 September.  It is not necessary to stand at your poster for the entire period of time, but do commit to spending some portion of that period of time at your poster if at all possible.

Last year’s event was a tremendous success, and with our prestigious visitors on campus (both for the Advisory Board meeting and for the Lucian Symposium), we have a great opportunity to share what our students have been doing in the area of research and the successes you all are having in advancing the frontiers of science.

Remember, it is not essential that the research occurred at St. Edward’s— any REU or other university research program at which you did research this summer is eligible for a printing of one poster.

Finally – if you were a recipient of a Brother Romard research grant this past summer, the expectation is that you will print out and present a poster at this event.

If you have any questions, please contact NSCIdean@stedwards.edu.

Looking forward to another great student research poster session.