Final Project – Hubbard, Ade, Hadden, Lohr

Breaking the Silence on Campus Sexual Assault

Group Members: Rachel Hubbard, Teddy Ade, Joey Hadden, Jeremy Lohr

“I’m a first year student here at St. Ed’s. I was sexually assaulted twice…”

The second time this 19-year-old freshman, who has asked to remain anonymous, was sexually assaulted, it occurred on campus during the school year.

A 2015 report from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center shows that one in five women are sexually assaulted on campus and that 90% of college victims do not report it.

After coming home with a young man from sixth street she was sexually assaulted the next morning. “When I went to eat breakfast he threw my plate and began doing sexual activities with me.”

“I felt used. I began to not trust other people in a relationship. You can’t have sex the same way and you feel taken advantage of and you’re just a sex object.”

She is now a member of It’s On Us, a sexual assault awareness campaign launched in 2014 by President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden.

St. Edward’s is one of just 224 schools to join the former Vice President’s initiative, according to former chapter President Maddie Cohen.

After the freshman’s second assault she did not want to use any of the resources on campus. “I felt like an idiot for letting it happen again.”

Her and Cohen state that it’s important for students to know where they can find help on campus in the case of a sexual assault.

Possible resources for students include the Health and Counseling Center and the office of the Dean of Students. Steven Pinkenburg, Dean of Students at St. Edward’s, is in charge of dealing with sexual assault cases on campus. Mr. Pinkenburg shared with us the steps taken in the event of these cases.

A survivor of a sexual assault case gets to choose how they want the situation to unfold. They can first report to the administration of the Dean of Students office or they can report criminal charges to the University Police Department. Title IX legally requires that all schools and universities must respond to and resolve any hostile situations that occur on campus, including sexual harassment and violence.

University Police Department Commander Homer Huerta shared updates the university is making for students including a new app called Topper Safe.

In an effort to help students feel safer on campus, Topper Safe will soon be released. Along with providing emergency guidelines and contact resources, it will also allow the user to request safe rides, submit anonymous tips, as well as the option to relay any questions or concerns.  

If you yourself have been sexually assaulted or know anyone on campus who has been sexually assaulted, know you are not alone. You do not have fight it yourself.

The Health and Counseling Center is located at Lady Bird Johnson Hall, 100. To make an appointment call, 512-448-8686.

 

Final Story Group 1 (Bach, Collins, Flores, Ibarra)

Small University, Big Growing Pains

In the wake of St. Edward’s University’s growth and development, neighboring residents have felt growing pains. Without any plans to stop, St. Edward’s is facing the rising tensions head-on to make peace with its neighbors.

When President George R. Martin was inducted in 1999, he began to plan drastic changes for St. Edward’s University’s future with a ten-year master plan in mind; he saw a potential for growth. Since 1885, St. Edward’s University has taken on a variety of different roles: a state charter, a university, a progressive co-educational college, a college for adult learners, and what it is today — a university with 23 international partners that seeks to serve students from all walks of life.

Recently, the operations building on St. Edward’s Drive has been a hot topic for Sherwood Oaks residents. Many residents have protested its construction with stroller protests, signs on their fences, and other demonstrations. One resident shares the general feeling of the neighborhood.

“Well it just kinda felt like they were making this street into a back alley, so it just felt a little dis-respectful,” said Joe Farley,  who’s lived on the corner of St. Edward’s and East Side Dr for over 20 years. Farley also stated that they had previously seen versions of the Master Plan that included the entrance to the operations building coming from South Congress Avenue.

Some St. Edward’s athletes have been targeted by angry neighbors, especially those who practice close to the street where the university is building the new operations building. This includes St. Edward’s baseball players, who have begun to experience repercussions from local residents regarding the increased traffic on St. Edward’s Drive.

He [a disgruntled neighbor] vandalized a guy on the team’s car when he kept parking in front of his gate, and [he] had a huge argument with the coaches when he thought too many baseballs were ending up in his yard. Last year, he actually shot water balloons at me while I was walking to my car,” Gable Whitacre said. Whitacre is a catcher for the St. Edward’s University baseball team.

The nature of university development, at least at St. Edward’s, means a flexible master plan that accommodates changes that are relevant to the campus community, according to Mischelle Diaz.

The growing student population, expected to soon reach 5,000 students, has pushed the university to work on its latest campus master plan that will guide the next 10-20 years. The planning team in charge of the master plan held meetings throughout March where students, faculty and neighborhood residents were able to gain insight on the incoming development.

Kit Johnson, the university architect, said the campus administration wants the Master Plan to meet the growing challenges facing the university. Along with the new operations building, the plan includes a new apartment complex, and renovations to Main Building and Holy Cross Hall.

Some members of the community felt mislead, due to a previous version of the Master Plan showing the entrance to the Operations Building being on South Congress Ave. That master plan is no longer available. Since St. Edward’s is a private institution, under city code, it is not required to notify residents of new building plans nor is it subject to public information requests.

With a master plan that could take up to 20 years to complete, it is likely the Master Plan will be subject to change again, but, hopefully, St. Edward’s University can devise a system of informing residents to prevent future confusion and anger.

 

Job Descriptions: Hubbard, Ade, Hadden, Lohr

 

Name Contribution

Rachel Hubbard

  • Organized and conducted interviews with the Dean of Students and the University Police Department.
  • Wrote interview questions for these interviews
  • Contributed to and provided information for the written story
  • Helped with audio recording for anonymous victim

Teddy Ade

  • Finding a victim and asking permission to them to tell their experience
  • Writing the victims script and conducting the audio interview
  • Editing and cutting the audio for the multimedia visual

Joey Hadden

  • Helped with interview questions for Dean of Students
  • Filmed interview with Dean of Students
  • Edited and exported interview video
  • Edited written story

Jeremy Lohr

  • Helped with interview for Dean of Students
  • Outlined, framed, and then rewrote parts of the final story
  • Interviewed Maddie Cohen, last year’s Its On Us president and still an active member
  • Worked on multimedia visual for victim’s story (WordPress didn’t support the audio/visual so this was scrapped in the end)

Graduation Complication – Final Project – Foster, Ramos, Chambers, Blay-Tofey

One out of two students at St. Edward’s University will graduate “on time” with the typical four year college plan. Many students find themselves graduating early, graduating late, or transferring to another school. While falling outside of the recommended four year plan can be perceived as negative, it is not always seen as a burden to those who experience an unorthodox college experience.

Graduating early is one of the many factors as to why students are not completing college in the typical four year span. Getting a jump-start on one’s career or possibly saving thousands of dollars on tuition in the process can be quite an appealing offer, especially with the cost of attending St. Edward’s rising year over year. Alex Soybel, a recent St. Edward’s early graduate, graduated in the Fall of 2016, a semester earlier than her original plan suggested. “I never liked the obligation of school,” she said. “I love learning but always hated busy work, so I just wanted to get out of that to be honest.” And her post-early graduation life seems to be a success: “I have a well-paying job, an apartment near downtown, and I’m only 21 years old.”

When a student is faced with the decision to transfer schools, a common fear is not being able to integrate into a new social environment. Hunter Williams, a student who transferred from St. Edward’s to The University of Texas at Dallas, claimed how “transferring was a scary idea” at first glance.  Although transferring may seem like an intimidating road to travel, the change of scenery when attending a new school can also be beneficial in terms of getting a fresh start. Former student Sam Dier adds that transferring away from St. Edward’s can be “so much cheaper.”

Pierce Soreals, a student who transferred from St. Edward’s to the University of Texas at Dallas during his sophomore year voiced that transferring resulted in an “academically more rigorous” experience. Despite the unique circumstances that both Dier and Soreals encountered when transferring, both of them shared a common challenge: loss of credits.

While some students may choose to transfer away, those who stay at St. Edward’s can also encounter obstacles that result in late graduation. Graduating late has a negative stigma surrounding it. However, two St. Edward’s alumni who took the unconventional path argue that taking their time to graduate benefited them. Both did not plan on graduating late, but they are confident they made the right decision. Erin Reas took six years to graduate due to transferring to three different colleges. Not all of her credits transferred and her graphic design degree at St. Edward’s was so specific it hindered her graduating on time. Reas said she “enjoyed having more time to make connections at St. Edward’s and having a solid career waiting for her.” Sarah Fumagalli took four and a half years to graduate due to double majoring.  However, Fumagalli does not regret it because she said when she graduated she “knew that when [she] walked across that stage [she] chose the correct career path.” Both argued they would not change anything about their college time frame and that students should consider to take the extra time to graduate to make sure they make the right career decision.  

Despite the number of students that leave St. Edward’s, the university has consistently maintained an average of an approximately 82% retention rate in recent history. This means that about 82% of each freshman class continues onto their sophomore year. This number is quite satisfactory in comparison to the retention rates observed at peer universities in competition with St. Edward’s: other small, private, religiously affiliated schools. St. Edward’s makes many efforts and initiatives to help students feel connected and develop relationships during their freshman year to keep students satisfied with their choice to be a student at the university.

Nicole Trevino, head of retention at St. Edward’s, encourages students to graduate in four years. However, she claims that the school is committed to their “moral and ethical obligation” to help students be successful, no matter how many semesters it takes.

Final Story- Helena Hild

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.

Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

 

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated work force where she will not get paid a competitive income, or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents, or by the fact that they had no other choice.

Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is that now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.

This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.

Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She adds that, “[Tinder’s] such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating, it is shown to have changed due to many people agreeing that it has become an easier way to meet people.

Pew Research Center found that users age 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users age 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that have reported that they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Research).

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.

Group Contributions

All group members were present and participated during the interviews. Edeliz acted as the interviewer, asking questions and responding to the interviewees, Helena recorded the audio during the interviews, and Karina and Jess recorded video for them which we decided would not add to our story, so we did not use it and instead opted to go for a podcast. Edeliz provided the main editing of the audio, as well as recording the voice-over for our podcast. She also wrote the script for the podcast. Helena wrote the initial story pitch as well as being the group’s secretary. Helena, Jess, and Karina worked on writing the story and Jess created the graphics.

FINAL PROJECT- ARRAZOLO

The Epoch of Single Women

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.

Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

 

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated workforce where she will not get paid a competitive income or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents or by the fact that they had no other choice.

Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is that now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.

This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.

Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She adds that “[Tinder’s] such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating, it is shown to have changed due to many people agreeing that it has become an easier way to meet people.

Pew Research Center found that users age 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users age 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

 

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that have reported that they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Reseach).

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.

 

Group Contributions

All group members were present and participated during the interviews. Edeliz acted as the interviewer, asking questions and responding to the interviewees, Helena recorded the audio during the interviews, and Karina and Jess recorded video for them which we decided would not add to our story, so we did not use it and instead opted to go for a podcast. Edeliz provided the main editing of the audio, as well as recording the voiceover for our podcast. She also wrote the script for the podcast. Helena wrote the initial story pitch as well as being the group’s secretary. Helena, Jess, and Karina worked on writing the story and Jess created the graphics.

Final Project: COOK, MORENO, SKEDD, AND UCLES

Students at St. Edward’s University tend to feel safe when roaming the 160-acre hilltop. However, the private liberal institution’s small size is deceptive of the amount of crime that occurs in the surrounding neighborhoods and on campus. Along with the crime attributed to the 78704-zip code, many students are unaware of the varied resources available in the event of an emergency.

However, this is not a reality that is translated on other institutions– especially larger public universities like The University of Texas.

This past week, a tragic stabbing left three students wounded and one dead. This comes a little over a year after UT freshman, Haruka Weiser was found dead in Waller Creek on campus.

The ripples of unsafety linger only for a few days at a small campus like St. Edward’s before students return to their day-to-day lives.

Students on the Hilltop feel safe for the most part by only taking minor precautions when roaming campus at night:

While the most popular crimes on campus concern bicycle theft and alcohol consumption by minors, St. Edward’s location in the 78704-postal code is notoriously high in crime.


Source: Austin Police Department

Source: Austin Police Department, Austin Crime Reports, and Trulia Crime Reports

Off campus crime finds its way onto campus throughout the year. Several times in the past, the university was placed under lockdown after armed suspects fled onto campus.

These incidents have become acquainted to St. Edward’s; however, many other crimes continue to go unnoticed.

The National Campus Crime Statistics Act, better known as the Clery Act, requires all college campuses to publish a report with all crimes reported that year.

These statistics revealed a spike in rapes on campus with 6 rapes in 2014 to 16 rapes in 2015.

Many St. Edward’s students were unaware of the spike in rapes, as well as their access to the crime report that the St. Edward’s University Police Department publishes every year.

One reason for the spike in rape reports could be due to the increase in education for students. With better sexual violence education, students claim to feel more comfortable about writing reports, and seeking help from the university.

However, not only have St. Edward’s students been unaware of the crime that plagues the surrounding neighborhoods, they have also been oblivious to the many on campus resources available for emergency situations.

In fact, little students know there are 23 emergency call boxes (indicated by candles on the map) located throughout campus that can connect students to a dispatcher at all times.

Despite the student’s lack of awareness, St. Edward’s police claim that along with continuously patrolling campus at night, there are a variety of resources to assure on-campus safety.

These resources, however, seem to be a little outdated. This most likely being the lead cause for the lack of awareness.

Commander Homer Huerta, who has worked for UPD the past 20 years, claims that the St. Edward’s police department have dedicated this year working on a new campus safety app, “Topper Safe,” in attempts to make on campus sources more readily accessible and updated.

Huerta attests that department is working to alter campus safety through its willingness to adjust to the needs of students:

Group Contribution:

From the beginning we realized we had a strong group of girls, and that together we could all equally tackle the assignment. The idea of one of our group members slacking off never crossed our minds, as it also never occurred.

Originally, we assigned Carlye and Olivia to the task of compiling the data and creating spreadsheets and charts. Carlye assigned to campus crime, and Olivia to the surrounding areas. Carlye and Olivia used crime statistics from Austin Police Department (2013-2016) and St. Edward’s Clery Report (2014-2016) . Myrka and Elizabeth were put to the task of finding interview subjects, as well as setting up interview times. We were to complete our individual tasks and be prepared to present our work at the following meeting.

After compiling data, Carlye and Olivia went around campus to take photographs for the interactive map. Of the interview subjects Myrka and Elizabeth went around campus and filmed a series of student interviews. Unfortunately, Commander Huerta refused to allow us to record his interview. However, he did agree to let us record his audio.

When all of our data was collected, and the interviews recorded we began to brainstorm what our main focus would be. We found that little students were aware of the crime and resources on campus. Being in an area with high crime rates, we thought it was important to better educate students on the matter.
After agreeing on our focus, we started the daunting task of putting our project together. Olivia created the final interactive map, Carlye, the group secretary, recorded each member’s contributions and edited the audio recording, Elizabeth edited the videos, and Myrka laid the foundations for the final written story. Collectively in the end, we all edited the final story, perfected the charts and tables, and compiled the multi-media and story onto the blog.

In the end, this was a very effective group. All members contributed equally, attended all meetings, and added to the overall effectiveness of the group.

Final Project- Karina Parra

The Epoch of Single Women

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.

Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated work force where she will not get paid a competitive income, or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents, or by the fact that they had no other choice.

Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is that now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.

This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.

Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She adds that, “[Tinder’s] such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating, it is shown to have changed due to many people agreeing that it has become an easier way to meet people.

Pew Research Center found that users age 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users age 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that have reported that they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Reseach).

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.

Group Contributions

All group members were present and participated during the interviews. Edeliz acted as the interviewer, asking questions and responding to the interviewees, Helena recorded the audio during the interviews, and Karina and Jess recorded video for them which we decided would not add to our story, so we did not use it and instead opted to go for a podcast. Edeliz provided the main editing of the audio, as well as recording the voiceover for our podcast. She also wrote the script for the podcast. Helena wrote the initial story pitch as well as being the group’s secretary. Helena, Jess, and Karina worked on writing the story and Jess created the graphics.

FINAL PROJECT – PEREZ

The Epoch of Single Women

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.
Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

GRAPHIC ONE

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated work force where she will not get paid a competitive income, or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents, or by the fact that they had no other choice.
Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is that now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.
This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.
Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She adds that, “[Tinder’s] such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating, it is shown to have changed due to many people agreeing that it has become an easier way to meet people.
Pew Research Center found that users age 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users age 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

GRAPHIC TWO

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that have reported that they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Reseach).

GRAPHIC THREE

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.

Group Contributions
All group members were present and participated during the interviews. Edeliz acted as the interviewer, asking questions and responding to the interviewees, Helena recorded the audio during the interviews, and Karina and Jess recorded video for them which we decided would not add to our story, so we did not use it and instead opted to go for a podcast. Edeliz provided the main editing of the audio, as well as recording the voiceover for our podcast. She also wrote the script for the podcast. Helena wrote the initial story pitch as well as being the group’s secretary. Helena, Jess, and Karina worked on writing the story and Jess created the graphics.

TEST DO NOT GRADE

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.

Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated work force where she will not get paid a competitive income, or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents, or by the fact that they had no other choice.

Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.

This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.

Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She was adds that, “[Tinder] It’s such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating is shown to have changed as many people agree that it has become an easier way to meet people.

Pew Research Center found that users aged 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users aged 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that report they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Reseach).

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.