Final Project: COOK, MORENO, SKEDD, AND UCLES

Students at St. Edward’s University tend to feel safe when roaming the 160-acre hilltop. However, the private liberal institution’s small size is deceptive of the amount of crime that occurs in the surrounding neighborhoods and on campus. Along with the crime attributed to the 78704-zip code, many students are unaware of the varied resources available in the event of an emergency.

However, this is not a reality that is translated on other institutions– especially larger public universities like The University of Texas.

This past week, a tragic stabbing left three students wounded and one dead. This comes a little over a year after UT freshman, Haruka Weiser was found dead in Waller Creek on campus.

The ripples of unsafety linger only for a few days at a small campus like St. Edward’s before students return to their day-to-day lives.

Students on the Hilltop feel safe for the most part by only taking minor precautions when roaming campus at night:

While the most popular crimes on campus concern bicycle theft and alcohol consumption by minors, St. Edward’s location in the 78704-postal code is notoriously high in crime.


Source: Austin Police Department

Source: Austin Police Department, Austin Crime Reports, and Trulia Crime Reports

Off campus crime finds its way onto campus throughout the year. Several times in the past, the university was placed under lockdown after armed suspects fled onto campus.

These incidents have become acquainted to St. Edward’s; however, many other crimes continue to go unnoticed.

The National Campus Crime Statistics Act, better known as the Clery Act, requires all college campuses to publish a report with all crimes reported that year.

These statistics revealed a spike in rapes on campus with 6 rapes in 2014 to 16 rapes in 2015.

Many St. Edward’s students were unaware of the spike in rapes, as well as their access to the crime report that the St. Edward’s University Police Department publishes every year.

One reason for the spike in rape reports could be due to the increase in education for students. With better sexual violence education, students claim to feel more comfortable about writing reports, and seeking help from the university.

However, not only have St. Edward’s students been unaware of the crime that plagues the surrounding neighborhoods, they have also been oblivious to the many on campus resources available for emergency situations.

In fact, little students know there are 23 emergency call boxes (indicated by candles on the map) located throughout campus that can connect students to a dispatcher at all times.

Despite the student’s lack of awareness, St. Edward’s police claim that along with continuously patrolling campus at night, there are a variety of resources to assure on-campus safety.

These resources, however, seem to be a little outdated. This most likely being the lead cause for the lack of awareness.

Commander Homer Huerta, who has worked for UPD the past 20 years, claims that the St. Edward’s police department have dedicated this year working on a new campus safety app, “Topper Safe,” in attempts to make on campus sources more readily accessible and updated.

Huerta attests that department is working to alter campus safety through its willingness to adjust to the needs of students:

Group Contribution:

From the beginning we realized we had a strong group of girls, and that together we could all equally tackle the assignment. The idea of one of our group members slacking off never crossed our minds, as it also never occurred.

Originally, we assigned Carlye and Olivia to the task of compiling the data and creating spreadsheets and charts. Carlye assigned to campus crime, and Olivia to the surrounding areas. Carlye and Olivia used crime statistics from Austin Police Department (2013-2016) and St. Edward’s Clery Report (2014-2016) . Myrka and Elizabeth were put to the task of finding interview subjects, as well as setting up interview times. We were to complete our individual tasks and be prepared to present our work at the following meeting.

After compiling data, Carlye and Olivia went around campus to take photographs for the interactive map. Of the interview subjects Myrka and Elizabeth went around campus and filmed a series of student interviews. Unfortunately, Commander Huerta refused to allow us to record his interview. However, he did agree to let us record his audio.

When all of our data was collected, and the interviews recorded we began to brainstorm what our main focus would be. We found that little students were aware of the crime and resources on campus. Being in an area with high crime rates, we thought it was important to better educate students on the matter.
After agreeing on our focus, we started the daunting task of putting our project together. Olivia created the final interactive map, Carlye, the group secretary, recorded each member’s contributions and edited the audio recording, Elizabeth edited the videos, and Myrka laid the foundations for the final written story. Collectively in the end, we all edited the final story, perfected the charts and tables, and compiled the multi-media and story onto the blog.

In the end, this was a very effective group. All members contributed equally, attended all meetings, and added to the overall effectiveness of the group.

Final Story Pitch- Olivia Skedd

It’s been a year since Haruka Weiser was found dead on University of Texas campus. Though St. Edward’s is just about five miles from UT, the question of safety is still common in students and parents. This past semester, campus was locked down as a man carrying a gun was suspected to be on campus. He wasn’t a student, nor was he targeting students, but the location of St. Edward’s, in the middle of South Austin, often puts it in the middle of crimes. What is the protocol for on-campus crimes and surrounding neighborhood crimes? Is St. Edward’s as safe as it claims to be? We will delve into this topic using resources from UPD and interviewing students, parents, faculty, staff and neighbors. For our interactive pieces we will use a video showcasing safety concerns and interviews. We will also have an interactive map detailing crimes.

https://stedwards.app.box.com/v/2016asr → here is the link to St. Ed’s annual fire and safety report for 2016
Pgs 43-46 list crimes that happened on campus (residence facility, on campus, non campus, public property), the professional educational center, St.Edward’s University in France, and Wild Basin

Headlines: Olivia Skedd

Two students injured in a fire.
At Mallory College, a fire broke out in a classroom at 6:30 P.M. when students tried to put it out. Firefighters arrived and after 30 minutes the fire was extinguished leaving $1,500 in damages.

Man pleads guilty to cross burning.
Fred R. Thornton was sentenced to nine months in jail after he and two others set fire to a cross in the yard of a racially mixed couple. The two other men involved, who pleaded not guilty, will be tried next month.

Pencils recalled with pro-drug message.
A student, Arthur Metzler, noticed the new anti-drug message pencils by Britton Pencil Co. when sharpened can actually support the use of drugs. The company has since recalled these pencils and will come up with a new anti-drug message pencil.

Pilot and passenger injured after crash.
Herbert Young, pilot, and Sarah Shields, passenger, crash-landed yesterday after losing power in their single-engine Beechcraft Sierra propeller plane. They hit three cars, but injured no one.

Finally Winter.
For several days this weekend, the metropolitan area will be hit with sleet, snow and freezing rain. Highway crews have begun to salt roads and utility companies are standing by in the case of emergencies.

Midterm Story Final- Olivia Skedd

Austin, Texas has been a central site for protests since the 1950’s. With the University of Texas and the state Capitol located in Austin, thousands of people each year come for marches, rallies, and demonstrations. With constant advancements in technology, however, location matters less and less for the new generation of protestors. People can voice for change and against injustices in 140 characters or less rather than marching down Congress Avenue.

Susan Stanford was walking to class her freshman year at the University of Texas in the fall of 1969 when trucks full of men in riot gear pulled up.

That day was known as the Chuck Wagon Riot and the first demonstration that Stanford was a part of.

Stanford’s life had been leading up to a moment like this. Her mother came from a very poor family, but was able to go away to college where she would meet Stanford’s father. The two of them instilled certain values into their children like respecting all types of people no matter their socio-economic status, gender, age, or race.

The 1960’s were a pivotal time of change in America and specifically with regards to social change.

Information about strikes, marches, and sit-ins were spread through word of mouth.

Now information can be spread to hundreds of thousands with one click. Social media has reshaped the way people can learn about movements, marches, and rallies and gather masses of people. A new generation of protestors, called Millennials, has formed using Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, and Twitter as their platforms.

A part of the new generation is Zoe Watts. Watts, 19, has lived in Austin for over 17 years. Social media is allowing her to connect with people from various countries, with different ideologies and values. Facebook to her “is a great way to share information and voice opinions, and to have conversations and start dialogues,” said Watts.

With so much information available, you’re sources need to be accurate and trustworthy. “I look mainly for sources that have been fact checked by a reputable source, or are  peer edited/reviewed, that take an unbiased approach at reporting a story,” said Watts.

Watts is queer, female, and a person of color, who feels that given this, is hyper aware of what is going on in the world.

“If we can’t respect each other and each other’s cultures, and realize that we can be different, we’re not going to get anywhere closer equality. I think some people need to realize that it’s okay to not be the same, and okay to be proud of those differences, but not be judged or treated differently because of it,” said Watts.

Though new mediums are available to voice injustices, why people are saying they will not be tolerated are the same. Generations will constantly be pushing for change. Marches, rallies, sit-ins, letter writing, phone calls, tweets are continually building on top of one another to create a more connected and informed world.

Midterm Story Draft: Olivia Skedd

Susan Stanford was walking to class her freshman year at the University of Texas in the fall of 1969 when trucks full of men in riot gear pulled up. They jumped out of the trucks and told her to leave immediately. Let the audio tell the story. Don’t let the audio and written story repeat each other. Think about that as you go through and revise. These different elements should work together to tell one story. And no audio of Zoe? Also, AP Style on quotation of punctuations!!


[I will be adding photos to all the audio clips I have]

That day was known as the Chuck Wagon Riot and the first demonstration that Stanford was a part of. You need a nut graph. What is this story about? Activism over generations, right? We need to know that right here so that Zoe’s interview doesn’t come as a surprise, as it does now. Tell us a bit about the history of political protest in the U.S.

Stanford’s life had been leading up to a moment like this. Her mother came from a very poor family, but was able to go away to college where she would meet Stanford’s father. The two of them instilled certain values into their children like respecting all types of people no matter their socio-economic status, gender, age, or race.
“You have to teach children the difference in people and I was very lucky that my parents didn’t”, said Stanford. Instead her parents were open to everyone.

The 1960’s were a pivotal time of change in America and specifically with regards to social change.
Information about strikes, marches, and sit-ins were spread through word of mouth. Stanford’s brother, John, would call her to tell her what days to not go to class and where she would need to be instead.

Now information can be spread to hundreds of thousands with one click. Social media has reshaped the way people can learn about movements, marches, and rallies and gather masses of people. A new generation of protestors has formed using Facebook and Twitter as their platforms.
Zoe Watts has been able to find her voice through social media. At only 19 years old social media is allowing her to connect with people from different countries, with different ideologies and values as her. Facebook to her “is a great way to share information and voice opinions, and to have conversations and start dialogues”, said Watts. Wow! Zoe is on my oral history site, Our China Stories.

With so much information available, you’re sources need to be accurate and trustworthy. “I look mainly for sources that have been fact checked by a reputable source, or are  peer edited/reviewed, that take an unbiased approach at reporting a story”, said Watts.

Watts is queer, female, and a person of color, who feels that given this, is hyper aware of what is going on in the world.
“If we can’t respect each other and each other’s cultures, and realize that we can be different, we’re not going to get anywhere closer equality. I think some people need to realize that it’s okay to not be the same, and okay to be proud of those differences, but not be judged or treated differently because of it”, said Watts.
Though new mediums are available to voice injustices, why people are saying they will not be tolerated are the same. Generations will constantly be pushing for change. Marches, rallies, sit-ins, letter writing, phone calls, tweets are continually building on top of one another to create a more connected and informed world.

[I will add more points to this map as well as a key with an explanation of the colors]

Audio Assignment w/ Script Olivia Skedd

Olivia: “5.7 million people [take a pause] The number of Americans who live with Bipolar Disorder [take a pause]

While many think this mental illness is RARE, it’s not. It’s seen EQUAL across sexes, races, ethnicities, and socioeconomic class. For many like, Kevin Friedman, 20 is the age when you first start experiencing episodes. As freshmen in college, [take a pause] Kevin had to figure out what a living a life diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder Type 2 would be like”

FADE INTO KEVIN’S VOICE OVER

Kevin: “And I’m just writing a million songs and skipping down the sidewalk, singing songs to myself and I’m thinking I don’t know if Jesus really was the son of God, but maybe he had other children and who’s to say I’m not also the son of God. And I was going to donate all my money to environmental awareness groups”

POURING PILLS SOUND EFFECT

Olivia: “Going from 75 mg to 150 mgs in his anti depressant medication triggered hypomanic episodes leading to his official diagnosis.”

Kevin: “A day then would be not sleeping but lying in bed just wishing I could sleep and staying in bed as much as I could because I didn’t want to be part of the rest of the world. Now I’m in school. You know I do my homework. I spend time with my girlfriend or friends. I go to band practice. I go to work.”

Olivia: “Having a routine is what many psychologists and those living with Bipolar Disorder says helps, especially [inflection] when it comes to their sleep schedule.”

Kevin: “One of the most important things is to make sure that I get 7 hours of sleep every night because if I don’t then it’s a major trigger to set off mood swings. There are some nights where we’ll have played a show and I get home at 4 and then I have to get up at 7 the next day and I just know I can’t do this two nights in a row or else I’m going to start screwing up my system. ”

Olivia: “Music has ALWAYS been important to Kevin and has grown as he uses it to process and accept his diagnosis.”

Kevin: “I just feel like it’s a really great natural anti-depressant. Because music is kind of my favorite thing in life, so getting to exercise my mind in that way feels really healthy and constructive to me.”

FADE INTO KEVIN’S BAND PRACTICE SOUND EFFECT

Olivia: “While music will continue to be a constant in Kevin’s life, he doesn’t want the PRESSURE that comes from a career in it.”

MUSIC FADE OUT

Kevin:”There’s kind of a scare that if you decide to take medication you’ll loose your edge creatively or you’ll become like a dull person. The medications are really getting better and with the way that science is developing these medications, there are fewer side effects and it’s way different than getting electric shock therapy in the 1950’s.”

Olivia: “Kevin plans on graduating with a masters in counseling [take a pause] where he’ll be able to provide support and healthcare information for people who are in the same situation as he was.”

FADE INTO KEVIN’S BAND PRACTICE SOUND EFFECT

PITCH Olivia Skedd

For my midterm story I would like to cover three women, each in different generations; a millennial,a gen X, and a baby boomer. I want to create a story based on how protesting has evolved and stayed the same throughout time. I want to included video of each women during their interviews, as well as personal photos these women have taken at the marches, rallies, and riots they’ve been at. I also want to create an interactive map that will trace the major protests that have gone on throughout the country beginning in the 60’s to present day.

Absolutely fantastic idea. This would be great for Hilltop Views to run for Women’s History Month if you’re up for that.