Final Project- Karina Parra

The Epoch of Single Women

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.

Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated work force where she will not get paid a competitive income, or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents, or by the fact that they had no other choice.

Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is that now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.

This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.

Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She adds that, “[Tinder’s] such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating, it is shown to have changed due to many people agreeing that it has become an easier way to meet people.

Pew Research Center found that users age 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users age 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that have reported that they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Reseach).

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.

Group Contributions

All group members were present and participated during the interviews. Edeliz acted as the interviewer, asking questions and responding to the interviewees, Helena recorded the audio during the interviews, and Karina and Jess recorded video for them which we decided would not add to our story, so we did not use it and instead opted to go for a podcast. Edeliz provided the main editing of the audio, as well as recording the voiceover for our podcast. She also wrote the script for the podcast. Helena wrote the initial story pitch as well as being the group’s secretary. Helena, Jess, and Karina worked on writing the story and Jess created the graphics.

Final Story Pitch- Karina Parra

Our final story will examine the stigmatization unmarried women face in our society and how they feel about being pressured to get married as they get older. We will be utilizing video/audio interactive elements to conduct interviews with Maribel Tostado, professor at St. Edward’s and a single, Mexican woman living in the age of sex and the city with inescapable cultural and societal pressures to get married. The interview will hopefully allow us to gain a specific insight into how Tostado interprets these rising pressures and if they have affected how she has planned out her life. We also plan to interview young female students at St. Edward’s to get another perspective into if young women in today’s society feel the same cultural and societal pressures that a somewhat older woman such as Tostado feels. Also during these interviews, we plan to ask whether or not these women’s cultures have played a part in creating some of the pressures behind getting married.

Headlines- Karina Parra

  1. Mallory College classroom goes ablaze

Fire causes $1500 in damage and leaves two students injured

  1. Man pleads guilty to cross burning charges

Two other accomplices plead not guilty to these charges

  1. Fourth-grade student points out misleading message on pencils

Pencil company to change anti-drug message

  1. Single-engine plane loses power while taking off and landing

Pilot and passenger left with minor injuries

  1. Winter is coming!

Metropolitan area to hit below-freezing temperatures during the upcoming days

Midterm Final Draft- Karina Parra

The City of Dallas is a city with one of the richest cultures in Texas. The largest influence and cause for Dallas’s rich culture is due to the ever-growing ethnic minority group: Mexicans/Hispanics. The people from this Mexican community help contribute to their neighborhoods with the small businesses they own such as their panaderías, their paleterías and their elote stands.

Recently, there has been an increase of businesses that have taken parts of the Mexican/Latino culture and have shaped it to work in their favor by making a profit out of it. Non-Latinos make their business in order to cater upscale (white) clients.

A prime example of this is Steel City Pops. Steel City Pops is an ice-cream shop that sells gourmet, all natural popsicles that started in Alabama and later expanded to locations in Kentucky and Texas, DFW area having the majority of these shops. The owner, James Watkins, explains the idea originated when he and his family were on a vacation and came across a shop called “Las Paletas.” “It was a simple store, selling unique sweets called Mexican paletas—more commonly known as pops. But they were so much more than just pops…When we tasted these amazing pops, we decided everyone needed to know about this.”

These kinds of businesses are not necessarily harmful to the community. In fact, this kind of gentrification can actually help communities improve their services, become more profitable, and provide stability to the area. However, one business that opened up in the Oak Cliff area called Corn Connection became problematic.

On Corn Connection’s Instagram, they insulted other food cart vendors, which are mainly Latino-owned businesses. The post read “Elotes with swag. Buy them from the G’s who let the candy drip, Or I guess you could buy them from some roachin’ ass cart in front of Home Depot.”

After Corn Connection’s post came out, hundreds of angry posts appeared onto all of their social media platforms. These posts noted the violence that came about by Corn Connection and attempted to educate Corn Connection’s supporters as to why the post is offensive to the Latino community especially if the business is profiting off of a Latino business to begin with.

23-year-old, Lupe Garcia, helps her father at his elote stand outside of a local Home Depot and when she heard about this post, she was upset. “More than offended, I was deeply saddened by Corn Connection’s comments because it showed a lack of respect to the hard work put into the very businesses that made businesses like theirs possible. It’s one thing to see an idea, like it, and want to put your own twist on it, but it’s another to insult businesses by implying that the people running them are dirty and somehow less worthy of respect. It was a not so subtle attack on Latino business owners.”

After seeing all of the angry posts, Corn Connection’s owner, Miles, said that the post was made by a former employee—a Latino—and that at the time, all employees had access to the account and he never monitored the posts.

Since then, Corn Connection sent out a public apology on Facebook—which is now deactivated. Although Corn Connection and its owners have taken down all of their social media, they say that they will continue running their business, which Miles says is only a part-time hobby.

Midterm Story Draft- Karina Parra

What is the interactive element? Remember that the written story can only be 400-600 words. So, how else are you telling this story and how will it all work together?

In the past, the City of Dallas has been predominantly white. However, throughout the 20th century, the city’s population grew in size as well as in its diversity. This has led to Dallas being one of the cities with the richest cultures in Texas. The largest influence and cause for Dallas’s rich culture is due to the ever-growing ethnic minority group: Mexicans/Hispanics. The people from this Mexican community help contribute to their neighborhoods with the small businesses they own such as their panaderías, their paleterías and their elote stands.

Recently, there has been an increase of businesses that have taken parts of the Mexican/Latino culture and have shaped it to work in their favor by making a profit out of it. Non-Latinos make their business in order to cater to upscale (white) clients. This paragraph feels like what your story is really about. I would trim the first paragraph and move more quickly to the theme of gentrification.

A prime example of this is Steel City Pops. Steel City Pops is an ice-cream shop that sells gourmet, all natural popsicles that started in Alabama and later expanded to locations in Kentucky and Texas, DFW area having the majority of these shops. The owner, James Watkins, explains the idea originated when he and his family were on a vacation and came across a shop called “Las Paletas.” “It was a simple store, selling unique sweets called Mexican paletas—more commonly known as pops. But they were so much more than just pops…When we tasted these amazing pops, we decided everyone needed to know about this.”

These kinds of businesses are not necessarily harmful to the community. In fact, this kind of gentrification can actually help communities improve their services, become more profitable, and provide stability to the area. However, one business that opened up in the Oak Cliff area called Corn Connection became problematic.

On Corn Connection’s Instagram, they insulted other food cart vendors, which are mainly Latino-owned businesses. The post read “Elotes with swag. Buy them from the G’s who let the candy drip, Or I guess you could buy them from some roachin’ ass cart in front of Home Depot.”

After Corn Connection’s post came out, hundreds of angry posts appeared onto all of their social media platforms. These posts noted the violence that came about by Corn Connection and attempted to educate Corn Connection’s supporters as to why the post is offensive to the Latino community especially if the business is profiting off of a Latino business to begin with.

23-year-old, Lupe Garcia, helps her father at his elote stand outside of a local Home Depot and when she heard about this post, she was upset. “More than offended, I was deeply saddened by Corn Connection’s comments because it showed a lack of respect to the hard work put into the very businesses that made businesses like theirs possible. It’s one thing to see an idea, like it, and want to put your own twist on it, but it’s another to insult businesses by implying that the people running them are dirty and somehow less worthy of respect. It was a not so subtle attack on Latino business owners.”

After seeing all of the angry posts, Corn Connection’s owner, Miles, said that the post was made by a former employee—a Latino—and that at the time, all employees had access to the account and he never monitored the posts.

Since then, Corn Connection sent out a public apology on Facebook—which is now deactivated. Although Corn Connection and its owners have taken down all of their social media, they say that they will continue running their business, which Miles says is only a part-time hobby.

Audio Assignment KARINA PARRA

LULAC Interview Script

Interviewer:   Since the annexation of a third of Mexico’s territory following the Mexican War, the number of Hispanics who live in the United States has grown rapidly. For generations to follow, these Hispanics would be harassed by prejudice that would later turn into open acts of discrimination and segregation. This is where the League of United Latin American Citizens, or LULAC, comes in. Their mission “is to advance the economic condition, educational attainment, political influence, housing, health and civil rights of the Hispanic population of the United States.” Here, in the St. Edward’s University LULAC organization, President Ashley Guevara is making an attempt to accomplish this mission.

Guevara: We’ve actually accomplished doing the petition for the undocumented students here on campus. That petition we were able to turn it in to the president, Dr. George Martin, and we’re still working with him on a response that he is going to give us. Any questions that he has for us about the petition we’re still answering so I feel like it was an accomplishment that we were able to get over 600 people to respond to our petition and sign it.

Interviewer: Although LULAC is fairly new to the St. Edward’s community, Ms. Guevara has been familiar with the organization from a young age.

Guevara: This is my sixth year in LULAC counting my four years in high school. I wanted to be in LULAC because, well, when I was younger, my older sister was in LULAC first and I got to see what cool things she was doing. She would go volunteer doing clean ups at White Rock Lake and so when I finally got into high school, I knew I wanted to be in LULAC, and, so from there on, I started to go to different events that they’d hold: city-wide, state-wide, and I went to the National Convention once during my high school years.

Interviewer: This summer, LULAC will be hosting their 88th Annual National Convention in San Antonio.

Guevara: It’s the oldest and biggest Hispanic/Latino organization in the U.S. The National Convention, it’s a really big goal of mine. That’s been my number one goal, is getting people to go to the National Convention because I feel like, until you really go to one of the events or conventions held by the organization, you still really don’t get a good understanding because the whole part of LULAC and the reason why it’s set up the way it is, with like presidents and state district directors and things like that, is because they want everyone to know everyone in the organization so that issues can actually be dealt with. Like some of the accomplishments that LULAC has been able to do is get the Pre-K program started, and they’ve also done so much in legislation to where it affects everyone, every each and every one of us in the U.S., and so I’m really excited to, hopefully, take a group of students to the National Convention in San Antonio this year because I feel like it’ll really open their eyes to what different things LULAC has to offer to them and you don’t even have to be Hispanic to be a part of that.

Midterm Story Pitch KARINA PARRA

For this assignment, I want do a video interview with either one or multiple zoo trainers. I want ask them how they got into the zoo trainer business, if they were always interested in it, and the process that they have to go through while training brand new animals and how they train the already trained ones new tricks. I would also dig into what kind of animals they are training and the animals’ background/facts.

Ok, but remember that are telling a story. So, what is the story? Are you doing a profile of a trainer, following this person through their day, showing us how they work with the animals. Remember the narrative arc we discussed in class.