FINAL PROJECT- ARRAZOLO

The Epoch of Single Women

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.

Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

 

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated workforce where she will not get paid a competitive income or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents or by the fact that they had no other choice.

Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is that now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.

This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.

Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She adds that “[Tinder’s] such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating, it is shown to have changed due to many people agreeing that it has become an easier way to meet people.

Pew Research Center found that users age 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users age 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

 

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that have reported that they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Reseach).

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.

 

Group Contributions

All group members were present and participated during the interviews. Edeliz acted as the interviewer, asking questions and responding to the interviewees, Helena recorded the audio during the interviews, and Karina and Jess recorded video for them which we decided would not add to our story, so we did not use it and instead opted to go for a podcast. Edeliz provided the main editing of the audio, as well as recording the voiceover for our podcast. She also wrote the script for the podcast. Helena wrote the initial story pitch as well as being the group’s secretary. Helena, Jess, and Karina worked on writing the story and Jess created the graphics.

TEST DO NOT GRADE

In the age of apps like Tinder and television shows such as Sex and the City, a change in how women perceive relationships and marriage has begun. The once popular opinion of marriage being the end all be all of a woman’s life has taken a backseat to a new idea focusing on their careers, personal relationships, friendships, and various other aspects of a woman’s life that aren’t marriage.

Recent statistics from the US Census Bureau show that the percentage of women aged 20-24 who are married has decreased from 46% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2015. When looking at these statistics further, a trend emerges which shows that overall in the U.S., women are in fact waiting to get married later in life.

Na’ama Shenhav, Ph.D candidate at the University of California, argues in a recent paper that the reasoning behind women waiting longer to get married is that they no longer have to rely on their husbands to provide for them financially. She goes on to say that previous generations of women did not have the same opportunities as the women of today and this directly played a role in why women tended to marry younger. For example, in 1970, a woman was faced with a crucial decision; does she pursue a career in a male-dominated work force where she will not get paid a competitive income, or does she instead marry a man who does have a career which pays almost more than half of what she would make? Unfortunately for many women, this decision was made for them either by their parents, or by the fact that they had no other choice.

Shenhav contends that the main reasoning behind women waiting to marry is because they are finally able to have fulfilling careers where they get paid an income that they can support themselves with. Shenhav also discusses some of the factors for marriage today and how they differ from previous generations of women, “as women become less financially reliant on men for household necessities, the decision to marry becomes more dependent on factors like love, social norms, or the desire to start a family”. Some of these factors are similar to the factors that previous generations of women used when deciding on getting married, but the only difference is now women have more options and opportunities to acquire jobs and careers and have the ability to depend on themselves financially rather than on their husbands.

This idea of being financially independent is one that Maribel Tostado is familiar with. She recalls having a discussion with her father in which she explained to him what her lifestyle meant to her, “I know you think that I’m partying every night… [about her late 30s and the club scene] but I’m not. I actually live a very healthy life… I have a condo, actually, I own it and I have my car and I take of myself. I’m self-sufficient.” Being self-reliant has become a priority for her and was surprised to see the conversation was all it took for her parents to recognize her lifestyle as legitimate.

Tostado also spoke about online dating stating she met her current boyfriend on the popular dating app, Tinder. She was adds that, “[Tinder] It’s such a rare place to meet somebody of quality” acknowledging the stereotypes concerning the app. Tinder among other dating apps is conceived to be a hook-up app used to meet someone and them never talk to them again. Despite this perception of online dating is shown to have changed as many people agree that it has become an easier way to meet people.

Pew Research Center found that users aged 18- 24 increased from 10% in 2013 to 27% in 2016 while users aged 55- 64 also saw increases in the number of users.

What does this say about the success of dating apps? Not much. Out of the 15% of Americans that report they have used a dating app, only 5% are married to a spouse they met online (Pew Center Reseach).

Even with apps and technology that make dating easier, women are still not getting married at the rate they used to. This forces us to face the facts head on that times are changing. With changing times comes shifts in attitudes and values placed on certain social mandates. It is no longer the age of marriage, but the age of independence and self-sufficiency.

Final Story Pitch- Jess Arrazolo

Our final story will examine the stigmatization unmarried women face in our society and how they feel about being pressured to get married as they get older. We will be utilizing video/audio interactive elements to conduct interviews with Maribel Tostado, professor at St. Edward’s and a single, Mexican woman living in the age of sex and the city with inescapable cultural and societal pressures to get married. The interview will hopefully allow us to gain a specific insight into how Tostado interprets these rising pressures and if they have affected how she has planned out her life. We also plan to interview young female students at St. Edward’s to get another perspective into if young women in today’s society feel the same cultural and societal pressures that a somewhat older woman such as Tostado feels. Also during these interviews, we plan to ask whether or not these women’s cultures have played a part in creating some of the pressures behind getting married.

HEADLINES: Jess Arrazolo

  1. Mallory College Classroom Catches Fire
    1. Two students left with minor injuries and over a thousand dollars in damages.
  2. Man Sentenced to Nine Months in Jail for Hate Crime
    1. Fred R. Thornton has pled guilty to accounts of bias harassment while other two accomplices plead not guilty.
  3. Anit Drug Pencils Recalled
    1. 10 year old boy causes quite a spur as he notices the mixed signals one particular anti-drug pencil is sending.
  4. Plane Crashes Before Reaching Airport
    1. Plane loses power just before touching the ground. No one is seriously injured.
  5. Bring Out Your Coats, Winter is Coming!
    1. The nice enjoyable weather will quickly dissipate making room for the cold sleet and below freezing weather conditions.

Audio Script: Jess Arrazolo

Jess: St. Edwards University prides itself on being inclusive to people of all genders, races, nationalities, and sexualities. A major selling point being that this exposure serves the community well. I sat down with Rafael Murtinho (Mur-TINE-ho) who is an international student to discuss the international population on campus.

Murtinho: I was born in Brazil and I moved to the Unites States my freshman year of college…

Jess: When asked about noting changes American culture within himself, he said.

Murtino: I just refuse to accept that there is….

Jess: We talked more about his direct involvement on campus within his job.

Murtinho: I am a resident assistant at the Village (dorm), so Hunt, Lemanns and Johnsons

Jess: I wanted to know how else he contributes to the St. Edward’s community which led us to talk about his event he’s most proud of.

Murtinho: I am a cisgender man who happens to be homosexual

Midterm Draft: Jess Arrazolo

Good. Now, this would be perfect if it were a first draft 🙂 As it is, you understand that a story needs at least one central “character,” especially an issue story. So, as a story pitch this is well done. It’s not a draft, however. Looking forward to seeing the story.

My midterm story will be on Aubrey Wilkerson. Aubrey is the Executive Director for Out Youth. Out Youth is a non-profit whose mission is to “promotes the physical, mental, emotional, spiritual and social well being of sexual and gender minority youth so that they can openly and safely explore and affirm their identities.”

For this story, I will be following Aubrey as he spends a day at his job interacting with the youth and continuing to create safe spaces by his projects. In this story, issues surrounding LGBTQ+ including acceptance, safety/security and personal. This will also be fit into the context of Austin and how the city’s culture either encourages and supports or outcasts the community.

While following Aubrey around, I will use a DLSR camera to photograph his day and the staff and youth that surround him. With these pictures, I would like to create a photo story in addition to my text that will further show the work Aubrey does.

Questions I have for Aubrey are as follows:

  1. How long have you been involved with Out Youth?
  2. What about Out Youth made you choose this and not another youth non-profit?
  3. What have you found to be most challenging for this position?
  4. How have you seen yourself change while being at this organization?

Questions for staff:

  1. Why do you work here? What about Out Youth speaks to you?
  2. How has working with Aubrey and the organization challenged you positively?

Questions for youth:

  1. Do you feel as if Out Youth has worked to create a safe space for you?
  2. What’s missing from here that you think would benefit you?
  3. How do you think Austin is in terms of accepting LGBTQ+ communities?