Final Story Pitch: Carlye Cook

 

(sorry I was absent on the day this was due, I assumed we only needed one per group)

It’s been a year since Haruka Weiser was found dead on University of Texas campus. Though St. Edward’s is just about five miles from UT, the question of safety is still common in students and parents. This past semester, campus was locked down as a man carrying a gun was suspected to be on campus. He wasn’t a student, nor was he targeting students, but the location of St. Edward’s, in the middle of South Austin, often puts it in the middle of crimes. What is the protocol for on-campus crimes and surrounding neighborhood crimes? Is St. Edward’s as safe as it claims to be? We will delve into this topic using resources from UPD and interviewing students, parents, faculty, staff and neighbors. For our interactive pieces we will use a video showcasing safety concerns and interviews. We will also have an interactive map detailing crimes.

https://stedwards.app.box.com/v/2016asr → here is the link to St. Ed’s annual fire and safety report for 2016

Pgs 43-46 list crimes that happened on campus (residence facility, on campus, non campus, public property), the professional educational center, St.Edward’s University in France, and Wild Basin

HEADLINES – CARLYE COOK

Classroom Aflame at Mallory College

Two students left with minor injuries, and an estimated damage of $1,500.

Man sentenced 9 months for taking part in a cross burning

Fred R. Thorton, 32, jailed for burning a cross at the home of a racially mixed couple. Thorton was accompanied by two other men, whom are still awaiting trial.   

One Company’s Major Fail with Anti-drug campaign

_____ company printed pencils reading, “Too Cool to Do Drugs.” However, 10 year old student pointed out that when sharpened the pencil only encourages drug use. Reading, “Cool to Do Drugs” and eventually when sharpened more, “Do Drugs.”

Plane Crash Near Stinson Airport

A single-engine plane performed a crash landing at the Little League Ballpark. The pilot and passenger are being treated for minor injuries. Herbert Young, the pilot, claims the crash was due to loss of power.

’Tis The Season For Freezing Weather

The metropolitan area is expected to be hit with below-freezing weather for the next several days. Highway crews have began salting down roadways, and utilities companies are expected to be on standby in case of emergency.

Midterm Story Final: CARLYE COOK

What simply began as a class project, has now become an organization that has impacted thousands of lives and launched a branch at St. Edward’s University.

Love Your Melon is an apparel brand that is determined to give every child battling cancer in America a hat. The brand also donates 50 percent of the proceeds to fund pediatric cancer research.

It was 2012 when, Zachary Quinn and Brian Keller founded Love Your Melon for an entrepreneurship class at the University of St. Thomas, in St. Paul Minnesota. Since then, the organization has grown into some 800 different groups, spreading across college campuses all over the nation.

The name Love Your Melon is referencing to love your head, whether covered in hair or not. One common side effect of chemotherapy, is hair loss. This is why the company wishes to give every child battling cancer a hat. The hats are aimed to help keep the kid’s heads warm, and to help the kids feel beautiful.

Collectively since 2012, Love Your Melon has raised over $2.6 million and donated over 51,000 hats to kids with cancer.

It was not until the fall of 2016 when Love Your Melon was brought to St. Edward’s University.

Beatriz La Vitola, and Aida Domingo felt the desire to reach out and make a difference. Both girls come from Latin America, where volunteer work is more of a common activity among young adults.

“In other countries it is more usual to do volunteer work, and we noticed we did not have something like this in Austin, and at St. Edward’s University,” said La Vitola.

The two got a group of four girls together to email and contact Love Your Melon, and shortly after St. Edward’s had their first Love Your Melon campus crew.

The main focus for the college campus crews is to raise awareness for pediatric cancer and to spread the word of the brand, Love Your Melon. The more people who are aware of the brand, the more purchases can be made, and the more money can be raised for research.

“We are basically brand ambassadors,” Domingo said.

However, the girls are wanting to do more.

Recently the crew has connected with two pediatric cancer survivors, Matthew Doyle, and Bailey Grahn.

“I will never quit,” Grahn said. “This is a lesson I learned and will use for the rest of my life. All of this was just a minor set back for a major come back.”

The boys have helped provide insight into the experience of having pediatric cancer, ways to help, and are now working on a fundraiser with the Love Your Melon crew at St. Ed’s.

“We are doing a fundraiser for Make a Wish and pediatric brain cancer. The event is to show the heroes and the family support on what they have been going through and to show Love Your Melon we appreciate them for doing this. We want to make this hard time into a memorable one, to have their reality fade away and to make the kids happy as well as their families,” Doyle said.

If you are looking to stay up to date with the events Love Your Melon has planned, follow them on Instagram @stedwards_lymcrew.

One can also help out by going to loveyourmelon.com and making a purchase. Upon checkout, select St. Edward’s as the campus crew.

Midterm story draft: CARLYE COOK

This is very nicely done. My overall thought is that the written story repeats the audio. What you want is for the written story and interactive to complement, not repeat, each other. Did you do any interviews with children and families who have benefited from Love Your Melon? We need that focus either as the written story or as the audio. In the audio, we hear you too much. Think about editing your interview into a story, not a q&a.

What simply began as a class project, has now become an organization that has impacted thousands of lives and launched a branch at St. Edward’s University.

Love Your Melon is an apparel brand that is determined to give every child battling cancer in America a hat. The brand also donates 50 percent of the proceeds to fund pediatric cancer research.

It was 2012, Zachary Quinn and Brian Keller, founded Love Your Melon for an entrepreneurship class at the University of St. Thomas, in St. Paul Minnesota. Since then, the organization has grown into some 800 different groups, spreading across college campuses all over the nation.

The name Love Your Melon is referencing to love your head. One common side effect of chemotherapy, is hair loss. That is why the company wishes to give every child battling cancer a hat. The hats are aimed to help keep the kid’s heads warm, and to help the kids feel beautiful.

Collectively since 2012, Love Your Melon has raised over $2.6 million and donated over 51,000 hats to kids with cancer.

It was not until the fall of 2016 when Love Your Melon was brought to St. Edward’s University.

Beatriz La Vitola, and Aida Domingo felt the desire to reach out and make a difference. Both girls come from Latin America, where volunteer work is more of a common activity among young adults.

“In other countries it is more usual to do volunteer work, and we noticed we did not have something like this in Austin, and at St. Edward’s University,” said La Vitola.

The two got a group of four girls together to email and contact Love Your Melon, and shortly after St. Edward’s had their first Love Your Melon campus crew.

“It only took us three days to get to 20 people,” Dominigo said. “It was really fast.”

The group grew so rapidly, they have had to create a waiting list to join the SEU campus crew.

The main focus for the college campus crews is to raise awareness for pediatric cancer and to spread the word of the brand, Love Your Melon. The more people who are aware of the brand, the more purchases can be made, and the more money can be raised for research.

The Love Your Melon crew at St. Edward’s has hosted events and promoted the brand through various functions since September of 2016. However, the most memorable experience La Vitola and Domingo said they had was visiting the Dell Children’s Hospital.

When the crews go visit the children they dress them up as Superheroes, because that is how Love Your Melon views them, says La Vitola and Domingo  For a few hours the superheroes are allotted a break from the hospital beds, and are greeted with a lot of love and laughter.

“They are given an escape from their reality,” Domingo said.

So this is where we need to hear from one or two of the children and their parents….When you do a story about an organization like this, it is important to interview the people who are benefiting/using it, not just those who have created it or work there.

“However, it was emotionally draining,” said La Vitola. “You could see how the children were wanting to escape from that reality, as well you saw the family of the child and they were so exhausted but so grateful.”

 

If you are interested in helping, go to loveyourmelon.com to make a purchase. Upon checkout, select St. Edward’s as the campus crew.

Audio assignment: Carlye Cook

Carlye: In Latin America, where Beatriz and Aida both come from, volunteer work is more of a common activity amongst young adults.

When the two noticed St. Edward’s University did not have a Love Your Melon crew, they took it upon themselves to open a chapter on our campus.

Beatriz and Aida: Introduce what Love Your Melon is, and how it works.

Carlye: While providing apparel for children in need, Love Your Melon also gives 50 percent of their profit to help fund pediatric cancer research.

Beatriz and Aida: Highlight customer importance

Carlye: How has being a part of love your melon impacted your lives?

Beatriz and Aida: Answer (“Very blessed to be a part of this”).

Carlye: How can one help out and get involved?

Beatriz and Aida: Purchases online/if you know of anyone struggling with cancer

Midterm Pitch: Carlye Cook

Mobile Loaves & Fishes is presenting #WelcomeHomeless. This is an event aimed to help promote community in the city of Austin. The goal is to gather a couple hundred volunteers, and homeless people to come out during rush hour, and hold signs rallying for the respect of the Homeless. I plan to interview, photograph, and possibly video the event.

I’d really prefer that you get beyond event coverage. What about an issue or profile? Something other than showing up and covering an event.