This is my final draft!

Erika Andiola- Undocumented and Unafraid

With more than 800,000 people in danger of deportation starting next March, Erika Andiola set out to do more than just inform the students of St. Edward’s University about immigration on Thursday. Her talk was a call to action to help re-pass the Dream Act, and to reach out to marginalized people who feel alone like she once did.

She spoke to all of the freshmen as a part of the common theme for the year: migration, and the experiences of undocumented people. The talk was on October 5th at 7p.m. and was open to the general public.

Andiola is an undocumented immigrant herself, and she is also part of the reason that the Dream Act was passed in 2012. Being a Dreamer, she has fought for immigrant rights and human rights for the past decade and is one of the most well-known activists on the subject. She spoke about her experiences growing up in Arizona as an immigrant and about her time as an activist.

“I’m Erika Andiola. I’m undocumented, I’m unafraid, and I’m unapologetic,” Andiola said, kicking off her speech.

That wasn’t always the case. As a young adult in college at Arizona State, she joined a small group of undocumented dreamers like herself. They started meeting regularly in the basement of her school to discuss their safety after 300 immigrants lost their in-state scholarships. It was a way to realize they were not alone, she said. However, she said, they were definitely scared. The group’s first decision was whether or not to keep the signs up that informed people about their meetings.

The group soon realized that they needed to be brave if they wanted to achieve anything, so they hosted a “Coming out of the Shadows Party” in which they proclaimed their status to their fellow classmates. They wanted their peers to know that if they, too, were undocumented, they were not alone, and they wanted documented students to know that they were people and they were all around.

This is around the time that the Dream Act was coming together. Also known as the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, it would grant temporary residence to people who had come to the U.S. under the age of 18 and offered the possibility of permanent citizenship under certain circumstances such as continuing on to higher education.

In 2010 the group risked it all. They went to the Senator of Arizona’s office and proclaimed “give us the Dream Act or deport us.” They were putting everything on the line, standing out in the open, vulnerable to deportation. And though the Senator chose not to deport them, they still lost. The Dream Act did not pass that year.

But it did pass two years later on June 15, 2012 under President Obama.

Andiola and her fellow activists achieved something they had long been hoping for that year. She said she felt as though it was her time to step away from activism and get a different job. She describes her state after the long fight for the security of Dreamers.

“I am so tired, I am so tired, I am so tired.”

All she wanted to do was get a “normal job” and get back to the hobbies she had left behind in the pursuit of something bigger than herself.
But the day that desire actually came true also entailed a wakeup call for Erika. The night she got a job, Immigration came to take her mom away.

Luckily, with the help of many friends and strangers who saw her plea for help in the form of a YouTube video, Erika was able to get thousands of signatures for a petition to keep her mother at home. She realized that her time in activism was nowhere near over.
Her next pursuit was to keep the parents of Dreamers safe. They came an inch short of achieving this goal.

Fast forward to today. With President Trump’s election came a whole new host of challenges for undocumented people. Trump has put an end to something that Erika and so many others worked so hard for with the swiftness of a tweet. The last day for many Dreamers to renew their permits was October 5th, the day that Erika gave her speech.

There are 800,000 people that will lose their safety on March 5th with the end of DACA.

The desperation in Andiola’s voice was palpable as she made a plea to the audience in her closing statement: “They need your help and I need your help, so join me and join them.”

Andiola encouraged the audience to tell their families and everyone they know at school to fight for this goal. One student that attended, Chelsea Kenniger, decided that she “should get more involved in activism.”

Her speech inspired more than just a passage of the Dream Act, Andiola also hoped that the audience would reach out to all marginalized people. It is not just undocumented folks that feel alone and scared, it is LGBT folks, people of color, and unfortunately so many more, she said. Erika’s words of wisdom? Every effort counts towards the difference activists are trying to make, something as small as a conversation is a step in the right direction. She urged the audience to ask themselves: “Am I making others uncomfortable by pushing the truth that I believe?”

Andiola believes that together we can work to re-pass the Dream Act. Only time will tell if her hope will become a reality.

This is my rough draft!

Overall, well done. Be sure to use last name only on second and subsequent references (go through and find all the Erika’s and change them to Andiola). Be sure to use neutral language. You are not an advocate. You are covering the news. Do it accurately, carefully and use neutral language. You should write for Hilltop Views.

Erika Andiola- Undocumented and Unafraid

With more than 800,000 people in danger of deportation starting next March, Erika Andiola set out to do more than just inform the students of St. Edwards St. Edward’s University about immigration on Thursday. Her -her talk was a call to action to help re-pass the Dream Act, and to reach out to marginalized people who feel alone like she once did. Excellent lede

She was asked to speak spoke to all of the freshman freshmen as a part of their the common theme for the year: migration, and the experiences of undocumented people.

The, <del datetime=”2017-10-12T23:44:10+00:00″>but the talk was open to the general public. Erika Andiola is an undocumented immigrant herself, and she is also part of the reason that the Dream Act was passed in 2012. Being a Dreamer herself, she has fought for immigrant rights and human rights for the past decade and is one of the most well-known activists on the subject. She gave a moving speech spoke about her experiences growing up in Arizona as an immigrant and about her time as an activist.

She started off the speech with a moving personal statement, “I’m Erika Andiola. I’m undocumented, I’m unafraid, and I’m unapologetic,” Andiola said, kicking off her speech.

That wasn’t always the case. As a young adult in college at Arizona State, she joined a small group of undocumented dreamers like herself. They started meeting regularly in the basement of her school to discuss their safety after 300 immigrants lost their in-state scholarships at the school. It was a way to realize they were not alone, she said. However, she said, they were definitely scared. The group’s first decision was whether or not to keep the signs up that informed people about their meetings. Don’t forget attribution. You must attribute all assertions.

The group soon realized that they needed to be brave if they wanted to achieve anything, so they hosted a “Coming out of the Shadows Party” in which they proclaimed their status to their fellow classmates. They wanted their peers to know that if they, too, were undocumented, they were not alone, and they wanted documented students to know that they were people and they were all around.

This is around the time that the Dream Act was coming together. What is the Dream Act? You should briefly explain it above when you first mention it. Don’t assume the reader knows.

In 2010 the group risked it all. They went to the Senator of Arizona’s office and proclaimed “give us the Dream Act or deport us.” They were putting everything on the line, standing out in the open vulnerable to deportation. And though the Senator chose not to deport them, they still lost. The Dream Act did not pass that year.

But it did pass two years later on June 15, 2012 under President Obama.

Erika Andiola and her fellow activists achieved something they had long been hoping for that year. She said she felt as though it was her time to step away from activism and get a different job. She describes her state after the long fight for the security of Dreamers.

“I am so tired, I am so tired, I am so tired.”

All she wanted to do was get a “normal job” and get back to the hobbies she had left behind in the pursuit of something bigger than herself.
But the day that desire actually came true also entailed a wakeup call for Erika. The night she got a job, Immigration came to take her mom away.

Luckily, with the help of many friends and strangers who saw her plea for help in the form of a YouTube video, Erika was able to get thousands of signatures for a petition to keep her mother at home. She realized that her time in activism was nowhere near over.

Her next pursuit was to keep the parents of Dreamers safe. They came an inch short of achieving this goal.
Fast forward to today. With President Trump’s election came a whole new host of challenges for undocumented people. Trump has put an end to something that Erika and so many others worked so hard for with the swiftness of a tweet. The last day for many Dreamers to renew their permits was October 5th, the day that Erika gave her speech.

There are 800,000 people that will lose their safety on March 5th with the end of DACA.

The desperation in Erika’s Andiola’s voice was palpable as she made a plea to the audience in her closing statement: “They need your help and I need your help, so join me and join them.”

Re-passing the Dream Act is something that we can all help achieve. Erika encouraged the audience to tell their families and everyone they know at school to fight for this goal. One student that attended, Chelsea Kenniger, decided that she “should get more involved in activism.”

Her speech inspired more than just a passage of the Dream Act, Erika also hoped that the audience would reach out to all marginalized people. It is not just undocumented folks that feel alone and scared, it is LGBT folks, people of color, and unfortunately so many more, she said. Erika’s words of wisdom? Every effort counts towards the difference activists are trying to make, something as small as a conversation is a step in the right direction. She pushed the audience to ask themselves: “Am I making others uncomfortable by pushing the truth that I believe?”

If not, maybe there is more we can do. Of course there comes a time when we all need a break from the frustration and exhaustion that often comes with activism. For this, Erika suggests that we all listen to our bodies and take a break when we need it.

With that in mind, we could all do more to make a difference. Perhaps our first action can be to help Erika Andiola re-pass the Dream Act.

No matter what causes we choose to stand up for, remember to “follow your heart, follow your passion.” Don’t make a speech. You are covering the news. Your role is not one of advocate.