Final Draft

Marie Lu headlines Texas Teen Book Festival

St Edward’s University hosted to the annual Texas Teen Book Festival as 39 of the biggest names in teen fiction came to interact with fans and promote their new work.

One of the most notable attendees was teen fiction writer Marie Lu, author of the best-selling ‘Empire’ series.

Lu, writer of the popular ‘Legend’ book series, spoke about her upcoming new title “Warcross” . The upcoming novel explores a dystopian future set in the world of video games. Lu currently has a deal in the works with CBS Films looking to adapt her popular ‘Empire’ book to the big screen.

Lu spoke on stage with member of girl gaming advocacy group the ‘Frag Dolls’ Ashley Jenkins about why she chose gaming.

“I used to work in video games so I always knew it was something I wanted to write about.” Lu said in front of a live audience at the St Edward’s recreation centre. “I’ve always wanted to write about videogames”.

Lu said she took interpretation from modern science fiction television series ‘Black Mirror’ in the creation of her dystopian future.

“I love adult fiction but it’s so depressing” said Lu on the topic of why she writes Teen Fiction Novels. “You see young people are this sliver of light, I hope you leave the story with a feeling of optimism”

St Edward’s Student and attendee Miranda Higgins enjoyed being able to meet Lu.

“It was pretty interesting to see her in real life after only seeing her picture on book jackets. She seemed very sweet and kind and seemed pretty passionate about her new book. She gave some funny anecdotes about how the story is inspired in part by her days interning at Disney a while back”

Lu, who emigrated from China to Texas when she was 5 years old, she attended the University of Southern California and interned with game developer Disney Interactive Studios.

Jason Reynolds, the author of young adult novel Ghost a National Book Award Finalist, was also in attendance speaking on his upcoming novel “Long way down”. He was joined by many of the nation’s best known teen fiction authors who took part in a variety of panels and talks around the campus.

Much of St Edward’s campus was taken up by the event as stalls selling books and offering signings were scattered around the collage. Many of the attendees were looking to speak with their favourite teen fiction writers from their childhoods.

However, it was not all books for sale. Stalls were also packed wither merchandise from many of the most popular teen fiction novels. Harry Potter was represented in full effect with many clamouring for Pottorised produce. From postcards to posters, T-shirts donning familiar slogans, anything an avid teen book reader would want could be found.

The Texas Teen Book festival itself was founded in 2009, when librarian Heather Schubert partnered with BookPeople to organize a gathering at Westlake High School that hosted 16 authors and 500 attendees. Then named the Austin Teen Book Festival the event has grown in the few short years it has been running annually.

First Draft

Excellent. You’ve got the news style/inverted pyramid down. Just small errors. Context would be nice. Never hurts, but, overall, well done. You should write for Hilltop Views.

Marie Lu headlines Texas Teen Book Festival

[Needs More content]

St Edward’s University hosted to the annual Texas Teen Book Festival as 39 of the biggest names in teen fiction came to interact with fans and promote their new work. Full name on first reference = AP Style.

One of the most notable attendees was teen fiction writer Marie Lu, author of the best-selling ‘Empire’ series.

Marie Lu, writer of the popular ‘Legend’ book series, spoke on about her upcoming new title ‘Warcross.’ Check AP Style for book titles at the Texas Teen Book Festival held at St Edward’s. The upcoming novel explores a dystopian future set in the world of video games. Lu currently has a deal in the works with CBS Films looking to see her popular ‘Empire’ book adapted to the big screen. “looking to see” – does this mean that CBS is doing “Empire”?

Lu spoke on stage with member of girl gaming advocacy group the ‘Frag Dolls’ Ashley Jenkins about why she chose gaming.

Put the quote in its own paragraph: “I used to work in video games so I always knew it was something I wanted to write about.” Lu said in front of a live audience at the St Edward’s recreation centre. “I’ve always wanted to write about videogames”.

Lu said took interpretation from modern science fiction television series ‘Black Mirror’ in the creation of her dystopian future.

“I love adult fiction but it’s so depressing,” said Lu on the topic of why she writes Teen Fiction Novels. “You see young people are this sliver of light, I hope you leave the story with a feeling of optimism.

St Edwards St. Edward’s Student and attendee Miranda Higgins enjoyed being able to meet Lu., she said

Quote goes here: “It was pretty interesting to see her in real life after only seeing her picture on book jackets. She seemed very sweet and kind and seemed pretty passionate about her new book. She gave some funny anecdotes about how the story is inspired in part by her days interning at Disney a while back”

Lu, who emigrated from China to Texas when she was 5 years old, said she attended the university University of Southern California and interned with game developer Disney Interactive Studios.

Jason Reynolds, the author of young adult novel Ghost a National Book Award Finalist, was also in attendance speaking on his upcoming novel “Long way down”. He was joined by many of the nation’s best known teen fiction authors who took part in a variety of panels and talks around the campus.

Much of St Edward’s South Austin South Congress Avenue congress was taken up by the event as stalls selling books and offering signings were scattered around the collage. Many of the attendees were looking to speak with their favourite Yankee spelling, please teen fiction writers from their childhoods.

However, it was not all books for sale. , stalls Stalls were also packed wither merchandise from many of the most popular teen fiction novels. Harry Potter was represented in full effect with many clamouring for Pottorised produce. From Postcards to Posters, Tee shirts donning familiar slogans, anything an avid teen book reader would want could be found. postcards and posters should be lowercase. AP Style is T-shirts

The Texas Teen Book festival itself was founded in 2009, when librarian Heather Schubert partnered with BookPeople to organize a gathering at Westlake High School that hosted 16 authors and 500 attendees. Then named the Austin Teen Book Festival the event has grown in the few short years it has been running annually.