Draft –

Hidden Figures: How Did It Really Work?

Hidden Figures, the film about the three black women who play a huge part in the first trip to space, was a huge hit in theaters, and was a huge hit for one part of a series of talks, titled Sci-Pop, happening her on St. Edward’s campus. Sci-Pop, was introduced for the month of October. These talks are every Wednesday night from 7-8 pm for the four Wednesday’s of October, all with different themes, ranging from Hidden Figures and the actual mathematic methods, to Game of Thrones, to Spider Man, and even Harry Potter.
This series of talks was organized by Professor Raychelle Burks, a new professor here at St. Edward’s. Burkes wanted to open up the world of science, math, and curiosity to all students at St. Edward’s no matter their major. Burks’ vision came to life starting in the Spring of 2017, in combination with other St. Edward’s University professors, who also wanted to create a space where any and all students were able to learn, ask questions, and experience new things. The vision was to teach students how their favorite television shows, movies, and pop culture references science. ,
Put quotations in their own paragraphs: “Where else are you going to talk about Game of Thrones?” said Burkes.
What is he a professor of? Professor Michael P. Saclolo, no comma here led the first talk of the series, titled, Hidden Figures: Euler’s Method Uncovered. This talk really delved into the idea of how the math behind the whole movie worked, and whether or not it was accurate. For those of you who haven’t seen Hidden Figures, the movie follows three black women, Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson, who are human calculators for NASA during the early years. These women were key parts in the NASA space missions, and Friendship 7 especially.
So, was the math accurate? Well, the math was in fact accurate to in? the movie, however no one knows what sort of equation NASA actually used in order to get the astronauts us to space. Saclolo explained the Euler method, a method created by Leonhard Euler during the enlightenment period. , however, However, in the movie they use a modified version of the Euler method. While there was a lot of math in both the movie and the lecture, the important thing to understand is that the math that is shown in the movie was in fact correct and the movie production team did their due diligence by hiring Rudy Horne, a mathematician from Morehouse College in Atlanta, to be the math advisor for the movie. So, although this information was not released from NASA, all of the math that was shown in the movie, went through Horne and its mathematically correct.
The series is continuing for the rest of the month, every Wednesday at 7 pm 7 p.m. = AP Style in room 141 in Munday Library. If you want to understand how Spiderman’s Spidery Senses really work, Harry Potter and the how transfiguration works or doesn’t work, and lastly, if you’re obsessed with Game of Thrones and want to see a real life chemistry example of fire and ice, this is an event that you certainly don’t want to miss.

Final Version –

Science and Pop Culture Crossing Paths

Hidden Figures, was a huge hit in theaters, and was a huge hit for a part of a series of talks, titled Sci-Pop, happening here on St. Edward’s University campus. Sci-Pop, a series of talks focusing on, you guessed it, the overlap of science and pop culture, was introduced for the month of October. These talks are every Wednesday night from 7-8 pm for the four Wednesday’s of October, all with different themes; ranging from Hidden Figures and the actual mathematical methods, to Game of Thrones, to Spider Man, and even Harry Potter.
This series of talks was organized by Professor Raychelle Burks, a new professor here at St. Edward’s. Burkes wanted to open up the world of science, math, and curiosity to all students at St. Edward’s, no matter their major. Burks’ vision came to life starting in the Spring of 2017, in collaboration with other St. Edward’s professors, who also wanted to create a space where any and all students were able to learn, ask questions, and experience new things. The vision was to teach students how their favorite television shows, movies, and pop culture references science.
“Where else are you going to talk about Game of Thrones?” said Burkes.
Professor Michael P. Saclolo, a professor of general education courses, all levels of mathematics, as well as science course, led the first talk of the series. Saclolo titled it, Hidden Figures: Euler’s Method Uncovered. This talk really delved into the idea of how the math behind the whole movie worked, and whether or not it was accurate.
For those of you who haven’t seen Hidden Figures, the movie follows three black women, Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson, who are human calculators for NASA during the early years. These women were key parts in the NASA space missions, and Friendship 7 especially.
So, was the math accurate? Well, the math was in fact accurate in the movie, however no one knows what sort of equation NASA actually used get the astronauts to and from space. Saclolo explained the Euler method, a method created by Leonhard Euler during the enlightenment period; however, in the movie they use a modified version of the Euler method.
Math major, Sydney Johnson, a student at St. Edward’s whose research advisor is Saclolo, said that her favorite part of the lecture “was getting to see photos of the original text. I (Johnson) just learned Euler’s method in differential equations so it was cool to see it in action.”
While there was a lot of math in both the movie as well as the lecture, the important thing to understand is that the math that is shown in the movie was in fact correct and the movie production team did their due diligence by hiring Rudy Horne, a mathematician from Morehouse College in Atlanta, to be the math advisor for the movie. So, although this information was not released from NASA, all of the math that was shown in the movie, went through Horne and is mathematically correct.
The series is continuing for the rest of the month, every Wednesday at 7 p.m. in room 141 in Munday Library. If you want to understand how Spiderman’s Spidey Senses really work, Harry Potter and how transfiguration works or doesn’t work, and lastly, if you’re obsessed with Game of Thrones and want to see a real life chemistry example of fire and ice, this is an event that you certainly don’t want to miss. However, if you can’t make it be sure to keep up with Burks on twitter and follow the hashtag #SciPopTalks. You can follow live tweets and even learn some of the fun facts from the lectures on twitter. If you’re more old school in your reading habits or want to do your own research on the topics, be sure to stop by the SciPop table of hand picked books pertaining to the talks on the 1st floor of the library.
Keep those spidey sense tingling and your magic spells under wrap because these SciPop talks are sure to blow you into space, or at least out of your seat.